We Are Sony Legacy

THIS WEEK IN CHART HISTORY – March 1972

March 17, 2016

What became of the people we used to be?
Tomorrow’s almost over – today went by so fast,
The only thing to look forward to is the past?
Theme song from ‘What Became of the Likely Lads?’

The last time I saw Richard was Detroit in ’68
And he told me all romantics meet the same fate someday
Cynical and drunk and boring someone in some dark café
Joni Mitchell – The Last Time I saw Richard (from the album “Blue”, 1971)

The last days of winter: 1972, England. Unemployment lingers over 1 million, for the first time since the Depression. Cameras were trained on the Saltley coke depot outside Birmingham. Industrial pollution. Bloody Sunday. Fog on the Tyne indeed…

CHART MAR 72

The culture-shock of the late 60s had left everyone with a fuzzy head – the counterculture was bruised by the swift, devastating blows of Altamont, Kent State, and Republican and Conservative victories in ’68 and ‘70. They had lost their rudder: 1972 was a post-Beatles world, and the four who had unified and steered the past decade were in open conflict (most egregiously on McCartney’s “Too Many People” and Lennon’s “How Do You Sleep?”) or retreat (“I wouldn’t really care if no one ever heard of me again” – Harrison to Record Mirror in April ’72). Elsewhere in the pop world, everyone was nursing wounds, trying to make sense of where to go next.

What had emerged was the golden age of the album. Their dominance had been cemented by masterful signal posts: ‘The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan’, ‘Pet Sounds’, ‘Dusty in Memphis’, ‘Let it Bleed’, ‘Tommy’, ‘A Love Supreme’, ‘Sgt Peppers’, ‘Led Zeppelin IV’. LPs had outsold 45s for the first time in ’69, and by ’72 their status as definitive, unified, autobiographical statement was complete. Whatever forward momentum pop had left would move at 33 ½ rpm.

 

The fondness for longer formats meant pop could be a little baggier. Concept albums were now fully in vogue, ideas left to meander for two whole sides – take Jethro Tull’s parody Thick as a Brick (no.8). The packaging claims the album to be a musical adaptation of an epic poem by an 8-year-old genius. The format lent itself to the stoner crowd – you didn’t have to get up and switch sides every two minutes.

jethrotull

This is an albums chart with soft, hazy edges, filled with white, bearded men with acoustic guitars. Despite the strong American presence, but the whole thing seems very pastoral, very English, with a sheet of morning dew, tasting of Embassy Gold cigarettes and dark ale. It’s also full of transcendentally beautiful music.

 

The clue’s in the name, but Simon & Garfunkel’s final studio album was the crossover record that made for a more soothing passage out of the turbulence of the late sixties into the new decade. Recorded in November ’69, and released in January ’70, ‘Bridge Over Troubled Water’s warm, hymnal quality sounds both like an elegy and a new dawn. It struck a chord: this is its 109th week in the chart: 33 of those were at No.1.

At once delicately arranged and magnificently vast in its melodies and scope, it’s a supernaturally well crafted record. It’s perhaps the story of the early seventies as a whole, emerging from stormy weather to create a work of soft, hymnal solemnity. (Pop always has a trend to let the spiritual back in, either in mood, or outright: The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards’ version of “Amazing Grace” would be No.1 by mid-April).

 

Simon, meanwhile, was branching out on his own, this time for good (his debut solo was back in ’65). His self-titled album is at No.1 for the first time, and its Latin-flecked rhythms and intimacy mark it apart from the stirring orchestration of the departing duo’s work (save for “Cecelia”, a key indication of his future career). ‘Paul Simon’ is relaxed, candid and open, a further step on a career of exceptional songcraft. He may have lost Garfunkel’s beautiful choirboy coos, but he was now free of the duo’s earnestness and grandeur, and the mechanics of two part harmonies. Luckily, Simon turned out to be one of the best songwriters to have ever lived – his stream of effortless melodies have quietly amounted to one of the best known and beloved catalogues in all of pop.

 

Another artist navigating their way out of the 60s to find their definitive voice was Carole King (‘Tapestry’, No.18 this week). Starting her career in the cubicles of the Brill Building, she was an artist of the pristine pop that preceded the Beatles boom. Her early partnership with Gerry Goffin would produce “Will You Love Me Tomorrow”, “Take Good Care of My Baby”, “The Loco-Motion”, “Up On the Roof”, “He Hit Me (And it Felt Like a Kiss)”, “One Fine Day”, “Pleasant Valley Sunday”, “(You Make Me Feel) Like a Natural Woman”. She’s written 61 UK chart hits. When all else is forgotten, she’ll be recognized as having a profound and singular influence in popular music.

By 1970, retreating to Laurel Canyon, barefoot on her windowsill, she tracked America’s progress and was making personal, raw, earthy music. Tapestry was number one on the US Billboard charts for 15 consecutive weeks – a record for most weeks at number one by a female solo artist which held for over 20 years, until Whitney Houston’s The Bodyguard. The love the album has received in this country is similarly enduring: she’ll perform the album, in full, for the first time this summer in Hyde Park.

 

 

ELSEWHERE…

In Freudian terms, the loss of something loved – in this case the 60s revolutionary, utopian project – can be responded to with mournful, moping melancholia. Alternatively, we achieve catharsis; we are able to move forward, because we have found something new and immediate to dominate our attention. Marc Bolan would help in this regard.

 

T Rex were pure muscle and glitter. Their ‘Electric Warrior’ album is No.7 this week, after spending 8 weeks at No.1. They’re a peak of early seventies pop, a group that seemed to strut into the new decade with a new optimism. Bolan, effete and pretty, benefitted from prevalent colour television, he shined on Top of the Pops. After shaking off their early, woody, wispy aesthetic (they streamlined their name and sound: from Tyrannosaurus to T), T Rex stomped their way to a string of effortless Number 1s, and Bolan, the white swan of North London, was Britain’s biggest popstar in ‘72 (even starring in a film, ‘Born to Boogie’, the first of its kind since the Beatles – it was even directed by Ringo and aped Magical Mystery Tour)

 

Another way forward first appeared at the Toby Jug pub in Tolworth on 10 February ‘72 – Ziggy Stardust. Whether in Beckenham, Berlin or outer space – Bowie would go on to define the Seventies, in all its glam and fractures, more than anyone.

Nilsson’s “Nilsson Schmilsson’ is at No.5, propelled by its mammoth lead single “Without You” (spending its second of five weeks at No.1 on the Singles Chart). “Without You” has hung around in myriad of forms, and its reputation as a big-chorused sulk does disservice to its small moments of tender delicacy.

Lindisfarne, named after a small island adrift off Northumberland, famous for Monks and Vikings, just smell of the Seventies. Never more so than in Fog on the Tyne: “Suckin’, sickly sausage rolls… think I’ll sign off the dole”.

 

That’s the given narrative of the Seventies, somehow inherently tatty, a country flat lining, after the frenzy of the sixties. The soft edges of this chart may be seen as calm before the storm – the threat of punk lingering in its air. The decade is much more multidimensional than that battle, we’d also have Stax soul, summers of disco, Rollermania, funk, triumphs in Jamaica and Germany, prog, metal, heavy rock and even emergent forms of rap, house and post-punk before the decade was through. The charts are always a broad church, trends ebb and flow, recede and re-emerge, and there is always room for the novel, the transcendent, and bizarre. The decade ahead would be a raw exploration of new, strange combinations, each in reaction to the last, which would form the groundwork of popular culture as we know it today.

 

Top of the Pops was broadcast on the 16th, hosted by Ed Stewart. There were performances of “The Wizard” by Uriah Heep, “Alone Again (Naturally)” by Gilbert O’ Sullivan (6), “Too Beautiful To Last” by Engelbert Humperdinck (26), “Hold Your Head Up” by Argent (21) and “The World I Wish For You” by Cilla, as well as the video to “Without You”, crowd dances to “American Pie” (2), “Beg Steal or Borrow” by the New Seekers (3) and “Brother” by CCS (32). Pan’s People danced to “Floy Joy” by The Supremes.

 

JM

VIDEO OF THE WEEK: PAUL SIMON – ‘ME AND JULIO DOWN BY THE SCHOOLYARD’

VIDEO OF THE WEEK: PAUL SIMON – ‘ME AND JULIO DOWN BY THE SCHOOLYARD’

Although the song originally appeared on Paul Simon’s eponymous 1972 album, the video for ‘Me and Julio Down By The Schoolyard’ wasn’t actually made until 1988.

Read more
Xmas Gift Guide

Xmas Gift Guide

Still short a few gifts? Don’t panic. We’ve got some great Xmas box set suggestions for you…

Read more
‘Electric Ladyland’ – 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition – OUT NOW

‘Electric Ladyland’ – 50th Anniversary Deluxe Edition – OUT NOW

We’re celebrating the 50th anniversary of one of our most exciting artist’s most groundbreaking records; The Jimi Hendrix Experience’s ‘Electric Ladyland’. Out now.

Read more
THE GREATEST LINES OF… PAUL SIMON

THE GREATEST LINES OF… PAUL SIMON

Undoubtedly one of our all-time greatest songwriters and Paul Simon’s poetry has embedded itself in the culture like few others. From crystal clear lyrical imagery to phrases that ring so true it’s like you’ve known them all your life, we collect five of the best.

Read more
PAUL SIMON – ‘IN THE BLUE LIGHT’ – OUT NOW

PAUL SIMON – ‘IN THE BLUE LIGHT’ – OUT NOW

Paul Simon – our Artist of the Month and one of the greatest authors of the American songbook – today releases ‘In The Blue Light’.

Read more
ARTIST OF THE MONTH: PAUL SIMON

ARTIST OF THE MONTH: PAUL SIMON

With ‘In The Blue Light’ released this month, and with his final tour coming to a close, our Artist of the Month for September is perhaps the greatest contributor to the American Songbook, Paul Simon.

Read more
VIDEO OF THE WEEK: Harry Nilsson – ‘Jump Into The Fire’

VIDEO OF THE WEEK: Harry Nilsson – ‘Jump Into The Fire’

Memorably used by Martin Scorsese in the classic 1990 gangster flick ‘Goodfellas’ and covered by LCD Soundsystem, this clip of Harry Nilsson’s rocker is taken from the little-seen Ringo Starr-produced musical comedy, ‘Son Of Dracula’…

Read more
‘BOTH SIDES OF THE SKY’ – OUT NOW

‘BOTH SIDES OF THE SKY’ – OUT NOW

Ladies and gentlemen, the new Jimi Hendrix album ‘Both Sides of the Sky’, featuring 10 previously unreleased tracks, is out now.

Read more
VIDEO OF THE WEEK: Paul Simon – ‘Still Crazy After All These Years’

VIDEO OF THE WEEK: Paul Simon – ‘Still Crazy After All These Years’

As Paul Simon gears up to say goodbye at Hyde Park this summer, it’s worth considering his monumental journey.

Read more
JIMI HENDRIX – ‘BOTH SIDES OF THE SKY’ – OUT MARCH 2018

JIMI HENDRIX – ‘BOTH SIDES OF THE SKY’ – OUT MARCH 2018

On March 9 we’ll be releasing a brand new Jimi Hendrix album, ‘Both Sides of the Sky’, featuring ten previously unreleased tracks. Yes, we’re a bit excited.

Read more
CAROLE KING – ‘TAPESTRY: LIVE IN HYDE PARK’ – OUT NOW

CAROLE KING – ‘TAPESTRY: LIVE IN HYDE PARK’ – OUT NOW

On July 3, 2016 legendary singer/songwriter Carole King delivered a peerless performance of her zeitgeist-shifting seminal album ‘Tapestry’ before 65,000 rapturous fans in Hyde Park. Now this landmark set is available as a 2CD/DVD set, complete with unique recollections from Carole herself…

Read more
CAROLE KING – RARITIES OUT NOW

CAROLE KING – RARITIES OUT NOW

Sony Legacy are proud to be completing the catalogue of one of America’s finest songwriters and composers, the inimitable Carole King

Read More...
RECORD STORE BLACK FRIDAY

RECORD STORE BLACK FRIDAY

Sony Legacy is proud to support Record Store Day’s Black Friday event on November 25th.

Read More...
LEGACY READER DIGEST

LEGACY READER DIGEST

A round up of the best from to read and watch on the web from September

Read more
New Jimi Hendrix Album – ‘Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69’

New Jimi Hendrix Album – ‘Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69’

Find out more about the latest release!

Read more
NYC Legacy Locations

NYC Legacy Locations

Iconic artists photographed and mapped around New York City!

Read more
LEGACY READER DIGEST: AUGUST

LEGACY READER DIGEST: AUGUST

What to read and watch on the web this month!

Every month, we’ll gather up essential online pieces for you to enjoy!

Read more
The Carole King Songbook

The Carole King Songbook

Carole King has written quite a few hits. Discover the new collection…

Read more
Pretty Green x Jimi Hendrix

Pretty Green x Jimi Hendrix

Pretty Green announce new clothing line inspired by the guitar legend…

Read more
LEGACY READER DIGEST: JULY EDITION

LEGACY READER DIGEST: JULY EDITION

What to read and watch on the web this month!

Every month, we’ll gather up essential online pieces for you to enjoy!

Read more
Legacy Reader Digest: June edition

Legacy Reader Digest: June edition

What to read and watch on the web this month!

Every month, we’ll gather up essential online pieces for you to enjoy!

Read more

Simon & Garfunkel – Top tracks

Simon & Garfunkel – Top tracks
Show tracks
  1. Bridge over troubled water
    Simon & Garfunkel
  2. The sound of silence
    Simon & Garfunkel
  3. America
    Simon & Garfunkel
  4. The boxer
    Simon & Garfunkel
  5. You can call me Al
    Simon & Garfunkel
  6. and lots more!
    ...
Iconic photographs mapped around London

Iconic photographs mapped around London

Take a different look at classic album covers and iconic pix from the likes of Hendrix, Dylan, The Clash etc.

Read more
Record Store Day 2016

Record Store Day 2016

Here are this year’s much anticipated releases!

Read more

Paul Simon – Top tracks playlist

Paul Simon – Top tracks playlist
Show tracks
  1. Me and Julio dpwn by the school yard
    Paul Simon
  2. 50 ways to leave your lover
    Paul Simon
  3. America
    Simon & Garfunkel
  4. Graceland
    Paul Simon
  5. Father and daughter
    Paul Simon
  6. and lots more
    ...

Jimi Hendrix – Top tracks

Jimi Hendrix – Top tracks
Show tracks
  1. All along the watchtower
    Jimi Hendrix
  2. Purple haze
    Jimi Hendrix
  3. Fire
    Jimi Hendrix
  4. Hey Joe
    Jimi Hendrix
  5. Little Wing
    Jimi Hendrix
  6. and lots more
    ...

Carole King – Top tracks

Carole King – Top tracks
Show tracks
  1. Child of mine
    Carole King
  2. So far away
    Carole King
  3. It's too late
    Carole King
  4. You've got a friend
    Carole King
  5. Sweet seasons
    Carole King
  6. and lots more!!
    ...
THIS WEEK IN CHART HISTORY – March 1972

THIS WEEK IN CHART HISTORY – March 1972

In our new feature we look back at what was happening in the Official UK Albums Chart, just about 44 years ago

Read more
THIS WEEK IN CHART HISTORY – 26th February, 1984

THIS WEEK IN CHART HISTORY – 26th February, 1984

In our new feature we look back at what was happening in the Official UK Albums Chart, exactly 32 years ago…

Read more
Phil Spector, 1960s Pop and A Christmas Gift for You

Phil Spector, 1960s Pop and A Christmas Gift for You

“There’s nothing as fervent, pure or huge as the teenage imagination. It deserved a soundtrack to match.”

Read more
Jimi Hendrix at the Atlanta Pop Festival

Jimi Hendrix at the Atlanta Pop Festival

Video of the week: Paul Simon

Video of the week: Paul Simon

This week in 1941, the extraordinary singer songwriter Paul Simon was born.

Read more
IN 1977 I HOPE I GO TO HEAVEN

IN 1977 I HOPE I GO TO HEAVEN

THE CLASH, PUNK ROCK, AND BRITAIN IN THE 1970S

Read more
Jimi Hendrix Remembered

Jimi Hendrix Remembered

It’s been 45 years since Jimi Hendrix left us…

Read more

Mrs Robinson

Simon & Garfunkel

Father’s Day Deals

Father’s Day Deals

Take a look at some of our Father’s Day deals…

Read more
We Are…No.1

We Are…No.1

…with Paul Simon: The Ultimate Collection

Read more

You Can Call Me Al

Paul Simon

Foxey Lady (Miami Pop)

Jimi Hendrix

Guilty pleasures

Guilty pleasures
Including Dirty Dancing, Belinda Carlisle, The Bangles, Bonnie Tyler, Rick Astley, a-ha, Earth Wind and Fire, Boney M, Billy Ocean and more

Natural Woman (Live)

Carole King